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International Journal of Mosquito Research
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Vol. 10, Issue 6, Part B (2023)

A hospital-based study to compare the clinical profile of P. falciparum, P. vivax and mixed infections of malaria: Retrospective study

Author(s): Dr. Duvvada Vijaya Babu, Dr. Palaparthi Srinivas, Dr. Sai Sweekruthi Thatikonda and Dr. Yendluri Suzanne Melissa
Abstract:
Aim: The objective of this study was to compare the clinical profile of P. falciparum, P. vivax and mixed infections of malaria.
Methods: This retrospective observational study included malaria patients who were admitted to a tertiary care teaching hospital. Inpatient retrieved and scrutinized on the basis of the patient’s demographic profile, clinical findings, investigations, treatment, and complications during this 12- month period. The institutional ethical committee approved the study. A total of 100 subjects were included.
Results: The study included a total of 60 cases of P. vivax and 40 cases of P. falciparum. The cases of P. vivax included 45 men and 15 females, while the cases of P. falciparum were 18 males and 22 females. Fever was the predominant manifestation in all 100 individuals, regardless of whether they were infected with falciparum or vivax. Subsequently, 80 individuals had chills and rigours, with 45 of them having falciparum infection and 35 of them infected with vivax. Among the total patients, 70% reported experiencing nausea and vomiting, with a higher prevalence identified in those with falciparum malaria (40%) compared to those with vivax malaria (30%). Another less prevalent symptom was easy fatiguability, which was reported in 30 individuals, whereas cough was evident in 20 patients. These signs were more often found in falciparum malaria compared to vivax malaria. Altered consciousness was only found in 12 individuals with falciparum malaria. Patients with mixed infection had a wide range of symptoms including fever accompanied by chills and rigours, excessive fatigue, vomiting, coughing, and changes in mental alertness. The bivariate analysis of the clinical characteristics and consequences of P. vivax and P. falciparum malaria did not reveal any statistically significant difference.
Conclusion: This study finding indicate that P. vivax mono infection has a comparable progression and consequences to malaria caused by P. falciparum mono infection.
Pages: 122-125  |  358 Views  153 Downloads


International Journal of Mosquito Research
How to cite this article:
Dr. Duvvada Vijaya Babu, Dr. Palaparthi Srinivas, Dr. Sai Sweekruthi Thatikonda, Dr. Yendluri Suzanne Melissa. A hospital-based study to compare the clinical profile of P. falciparum, P. vivax and mixed infections of malaria: Retrospective study. Int J Mosq Res 2023;10(6):122-125. DOI: https://doi.org/10.22271/23487941.2023.v10.i6b.726
International Journal of Mosquito Research

International Journal of Mosquito Research

International Journal of Mosquito Research
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